Caring People Donate Items Helping Build Positive Police Community Relationships

After attending a Quincy Illinois Poverty Project talk at the Blessing-Rieman College of Nursing & Health Sciences in November, 2018, Andrea Tangerose, who is also a bartender at North End Tavern in Quincy, asked patrons to bring in hats, gloves or toiletry items in an effort to help those in need. Dozens of items ranging from gloves, knit hats, warm socks, childrens toys, and various personal hygiene items were collected. “Thank you to those who brought in donations,” Andrea said. “If we all work together as a community, we may not end all poverty, but at least we can make some difference in the area around us."

December 2018:  Dozens of donated items collected from the patrons of the North End Tavern in Quincy, will be distributed by Quincy police patrol officers. Andrea Tangerose, bartender, at the North End Tavern, initiated the collecting of items in an effort to help those in need in our community after attending a Quincy Illinois Poverty Project talk in November at the Blessing-Rieman College of Nursing & Health.   Photo by Steve Bohnstedt/Quincy Illinois Poverty Project.

December 2018: Dozens of donated items collected from the patrons of the North End Tavern in Quincy, will be distributed by Quincy police patrol officers. Andrea Tangerose, bartender, at the North End Tavern, initiated the collecting of items in an effort to help those in need in our community after attending a Quincy Illinois Poverty Project talk in November at the Blessing-Rieman College of Nursing & Health. Photo by Steve Bohnstedt/Quincy Illinois Poverty Project.

The much appreciated items will be delivered to Bill Calkins, Quincy Police Department patrol officer, who will distribute the individually packaged goods to interested patrol officers, providing them with the opportunity to use their own discretion, when handing out the packages to those who are disadvantaged within their patrol beats.

Calkins initiated the idea after learning individuals in the community were contacting the The Quincy Illinois Poverty Project, inquiring how they might receive help, or guidance in delivering items directly to those in need. Calkins explained how such an opportunity can benefit both the community and the police as an additional way of building positive police and community relationships. “It’s a win, win situation for everybody,” Calkins said.

The Quincy Illinois Poverty Project appreciates the many inquiries it receives, as I am interested in helping direct your donation items to various local programs I’ve identified as having a proven track record based on my years of working closely with the homeless and disadvantaged in Quincy.

It is my hope, we will all continue to find creative, progressive ways to help those who are struggling in our community. Thank you Andrea, and to all those who give of themselves to help others. Thank you for the inspiration you’ve provided me and many others by this simple yet incredibly important act of caring. For those who are powerless and often forgotten, these care packages will restore a measure of human dignity, so many in our community struggle to hold on to. Again, Thank you.

Sincerely,

Steve Bohnstedt

Director, Quincy Illinois Poverty Project